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Boston Drowsy Driving Prevention Week — Young Motorists at High Risk

Our youngest drivers are at the highest risks for drowsy driving car accidents.

According to a recent study from the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, drivers between 16- and 24-years-old are more likely to drive while feeling sleepy than any other age group of drivers. Officials with AAA conducted a survey with these young drivers and found that one out of every seven of them reported that they’ve nodded off behind the wheel at least once in the last year. With drivers in other age groups, only one out of every ten admitted to falling sleep at the wheel.
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The new findings come with the most recently drowsy driving statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). According to data, these young drivers were more than 75 percent more likely to get into a drowsy driving car accident than older drivers.

Our Boston car accident lawyers are asking parents and guardians to talk with the teen drivers in their life about the risks associated with drowsy driving. Remember that the state of Massachusetts has nighttime driving restrictions for these young drivers. While drowsy driving car accidents are most likely to happen during the evening hours, they can happen at any time of the day. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), drivers with a restricted driver’s license are not allowed to drive from 12:30 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. These restrictions are lifted when a driver turns 18. Although they have an unrestricted driver’s license at this age, they’re not off the hook. Make sure you continue the conversation about safe driving habits even when the driving restrictions are lifted.

Nationwide, one out of every six fatal car accidents involves a drowsy driver. For this reason, drowsy driving is one of the top causes for car accidents.

“Research shows that fatigue impairs safe driving, with many symptoms causing drivers to behave in ways similar to those who are intoxicated,” said AAA CEO & President, Robert Darbelnet.

As we head into the dangerous holiday driving season, young drivers are asked to beware and to stay awake. Many of these young drivers will be heading home for Thanksgiving break, a time when car accidents are plentiful.

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